Charles Martin

Biography of Charles Martin

Charles Martin
Charles Martin

From 1898 Charles Aristide Martin was a lecturer in French Language and Literature at Glasgow University. He later acted as the head of the French department. During the First World War Charles fought in the 102e Regiment d’Infanterie for which he won many military medals including the Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur and the Croix de Guerre.

In 1919 Charles returned to Glasgow University and was appointed the first Marshall Professor of French which he held until his death in 1936.

Martin was also a founding member of the Franco-Scottish society. He sat on the council for the Scottish branch in Glasgow alongside the Lord Provost of Glasgow and the Principal of Glasgow University Sir Donald McAlister. He delivered many lectures on French culture and literature including lectures on the author Honoré de Balzac, “Madame de Staël et l’Angleterre” and “L’état actuel des questions feminists en France.”

Charles and his wife Lucie Martin (née Wabnitz) came to Glasgow as a young couple and had three girls all of whom were taught at Laurel Bank High School. The family lived in Glasgow for many years making notable contributions to the cultural and national relations between Scotland and France.

Charles died suddenly on 18th October 1936. There was a memorial service in the University Chapel on 21st October, followed by a private funeral. His obituary in the Glasgow Herald noted that “his middle name, his carefully cultivated beard and his wide brimming hat helped to form the personality of the man, who was so well liked at Gillmorehill that he was affectionately called “Charlie” even by those students who did not take his classes.”

Summary

Charles Martin
Died 18 October 1936.
University Link: Lecturer, Professor
GU Degree:
Occupation categories: language scholars
Record last updated: 5th Oct 2018

University Connections

University Roles

  • Lecturer
  • Professor

Academic Posts

Professorships:

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