Ivan Andreyevich Tretyakov

Biography of Ivan Andreyevich Tretyakov

Letter from Simeon Desnitzky and Ivan Tretjakoff, 1767
Letter from Simeon Desnitzky and Ivan Tretjakoff, 1767

Ivan Andreyevich Tretyakov graduated from the University of Glasgow with an MA in 1765 and an LLD in 1767 before becoming Professor of Russian Law at the University of Moscow (1767-73).

Tretyakov was born in Tver around 1735, son of an army officer. He received his early education in the religious seminary in Tver and then went for a short time to Moscow University where he met Semyon Efimovich Desnitsky, with whom he would study at the University of Glasgow under the patronage of the Empress Elizabeth II.

Tretyakov studied under Adam Smith, attending his classes in Ethics and Jurisprudence. He also attended the Civil Law classes of John Millar, who continued to develop ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment that had begun with another great eighteenth-century Scottish philosopher based at the University, Francis Hutcheson, Professor of Moral Philosophy (1729-1746). The two Russian students were also taught by Adam Smith's successor Thomas Reid, 'the Common-Sense Philosopher', and the brilliant scientific innovator, Joseph Black, Professor of Medicine and lecturer in Chemistry until 1766.

Ordered to return home to Russia, Tretyakov was appointed Professor of Russian Law at the University of Moscow (1767-87), and so joined Desnitsky as one of the first Russians to hold the chair of law at Russia's first University. Both Tretyakov and Desnitsky introduced and disseminated the ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment, and Smithsonian ideas, each publishing books in Russian, which were considered largely verbatim transcriptions of Smith's lectures.

Summary

Ivan Andreyevich Tretyakov
Born 1735.
Died 1776.
University Link: Graduate
GU Degrees: MA, 1764; LLD, 1767;
Occupation categories: lawyers
Record last updated: 26th May 2016

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