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John Rutherglen

Biography of John Rutherglen

John G Rutherglen (1920-1976) was titular Professor of Natural Philosophy at the University from 1964 until his death in 1976.

Born in London, Rutherglen studied Physics at King's College and then worked with Philip Dee on his research on radar and TRE during the Second World War. When Dee came to the University as Professor of Natural Philosophy in 1946, he brought Rutherglen with him to continue his work on microwave techniques and pulsed electronic circuit design. Rutherglen worked on the design and construction of the ion source for the University's new 30 meV electron synchrotron and and was subsequently responsible for its assembly and operation. He was a member of the team that used the HT set in studying the energy levels of light nuclei, and he continued his research in photons for the rest of his life.

Rutherglen was awarded a PhD by the University in 1951, when he was appointed a lecturer, and he was appointed Senior Lecturer in 1955. From 1964 he was an experimental group leader working with the Science Research Council's 4000 MeV electron synchroton known as NINA at Daresbury, while he continued to lead a group at the University in the e-gamma experiment.

A talented sportsman, Rutherglen won the West of Scotland Tennis Championship in 1950 and 1952 and played at Wimbledon, and he was a prominent figure in the staff golf club. In 1976 he was granted leave of absence to pursue his research at Cern in Switzerland, but died in a road accident in Geneva a few weeks after his arrival in Switzerland.

Summary

John Rutherglen
Physicist

Born 1920, London, England.
Died 26 August 1976.
University Link: Alumnus, Lecturer, Professor
GU Degree: PhD, 1951;
Occupation categories: physicists
Record last updated: 5th Mar 2013

University Connections

University Roles

  • Alumnus
  • Lecturer
  • Professor

Academic Posts

Professorships:

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