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Sir John McNee

Biography of Sir John McNee

Sir John McNee
Sir John McNee

Sir John William McNee (1887-1984) was a graduate of the University who was Regius Professor of Practice of Medicine from 1936 to 1953. He was awarded an LLD in 1954.

Born in Mount Vernon on the outskirts of Glasgow, Mackintosh graduated from the University in 1909, MB, ChB with honours. He gained practical experience in Pathology and Medicine before studying as a research scholar at the University of Freiburg. In 1914 he graduated MD and was awarded a Bellahouston Gold Medal. He worked for a time at the Gardiner Institute of Medicine in the Western Infirmary.

During the First World War, McNee served in the RAMC in France and was an assistant advisor in Pathology to the First Army. He won the DSO in 1918 and was mentioned in despatches. He went to London after the war to work at the new teaching unit at the University College Hospital, becoming Deputy Director of the unit and a physician at the hospital. He was awarded a DSc in 1920.

During the Second World War, McNee served as a Surgeon Rear-Admiral and organised medical personnel and the equipment of medical ships. However, he continued to pursue his pioneering research on the liver and spleen and co-authored the popular Text-book of Medical Treatment (1939).

McNee was Physician to the King in Scotland, 1937 to 1952, and to the Queen, 1952 to 1954. He was knighted in 1951.

Summary

Sir John McNee
Physician and Pathologist

Born 17 December 1887, Mount Vernon , Scotland.
Died 26 January 1984.
University Link: Alumnus, Professor
GU Degrees: LLD, 1954; MB ChB, 1909; MD, 1914; DSc, 1920;
Occupation categories: pathologists; physicians
NNAF Reference: GB/NNAF/P159032
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Record last updated: 15th Dec 2016

University Connections

University Roles

  • Alumnus
  • Professor

Awards

Academic Posts

Professorships:

Buildings

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